Data Profile

Profile of respondents in the online survey

The online nationwide survey received 1407 completed responses with respondents from all thirty-two councils.  This represents an 80% completion rate (1407/1751).  The general demographic of respondents were as follows.

Respondents to the online survey were almost equally distributed between male (51%) and female (49%) (Table 1).  They were well spread over the age ranges with a majority (26%) falling into the 45-54 year old age group (Chart 1).  The vast majority of respondents (75.3%) reported living in Scotland for 21 years or more (Table 2). Respondents came from all thirty-two council jurisdictions with Glasgow (18.3%) and Edinburgh (16.7%) accounting for the highest respondent rate and Shetland (0.2%) and Inverclyde (0.8%) accounting for the lowest respondent rate (Chart 2).

Table 1: Gender and age ranges of participants

Total 16-24 (% of total) 25-34 (% of total) 36-44 (% of total) 45-54 (% of total) 55-64 (% of total) 65-74 (% of total) 75 and over (% of total)
Male 718 (51%) 54 (3.8%) 109 (7.7%) 134(9.5%) 180 (12.8%) 142 (10.1%) 77 (5.5%) 22 (1.6%)
Female 689 (49%) 56 (4.0%) 130 (9.2%) 139 (9.9%) 180 (12.8%) 121 (8.6%) 59 (4.2% 4 (0.3%)
Total 1407 (100% 110 (7.8%) 239 (17.0%) 273 (19.4%) 360 (25.6%) 263 (18.7%) 136 (9.7%) 26 (1.8%)

 

Chart 1: Age range distribution of participants

Age range distribution of participants

Table 2: Distribution and length of time participants have lived in Scotland

Length of time living in Scotland Frequency (%)
0-5 years 133 (9.5%)
6-10 years 89 (6.3%)
11-15 years 67 (4.8%)
16-20 years 58 (4.1%)
over 21 years 259 (18.4%)
all my life 801 (56.9%)
Total 1407 (100.0%)

 

Chart 2: Respondents present residence by council

 Large - Respondents present residence by council

 

Of these 1407 completed responses from across the thirty-two council jurisdictions, respondent self-identification revealed four major groups.  The largest self-identification was “religion only” at 41.1%, followed by “belief only” at 20.3%.  Interestingly, 27.2% of respondents identified with both “religion” and “belief”, while 11.4% of respondents identified with neither “religion” nor “belief” (see Table 3 and Chart 3):

Table 3: Total sample by religion/belief group

Frequency (%)
Religious Group Only 578 (41.1%)
Belief Group Only 285 (20.3%)
Combined Religious and Belief Group 383 (27.2%)
None Religious or Belief Group 161 (11.4%)
Total 1407 (100%)

 

Chart 3: Total sample by religion/belief group (%)

Large - Total sample by religious:belief group

 

Each of these four main groups contain a number of subcategories. The largest sub-category for religion was the “none” category at 31.7%. However, a majority of this category identified with a “belief” group. Compensating for this, the largest sub-category for religion was “other religion” at 26.4% and the smallest was the “Brahma Kumaris” at 0.2% (Table 4). The largest category for belief was the “other” category at 17.4%. However, a majority of these 17.4% respondents chose “other” in the belief category and then wrote in their religion. Compensating for this, the largest sub-category for belief was “combination” at 9.9%. That is, respondents who self-identified with both humanism and secularism. The smallest sub-category was “secular affiliated” at 2.6%. It should be noted that 0.5% (7 respondents) skipped this question altogether (Table 5).

 

Table 4: Breakdown of religion respondents                  Table 5: Breakdown of belief respondents

ReligionFrequency (%)
None 446 (31.7%)
Church of Scotland 242 (17.2%)
Roman Catholicism 98 (7.0%)
Islam 45 (3.2%)
Buddhism 14 (1.0%
Sikhism 12 (0.9%)
Judaism 20 (1.4%)
Hinduism 11 (0.8%)
Brahma Kumaris 3 (0.2%)
Paganism 138 (9.8%)
Baha’i Faith 9 (0.6%)
Other religion 369 (26.4%)
Total 1407 (100.0%)
BeliefFrequency (%)
None 736 (52.3%)
Humanist affiliated 129 (9.2%)
Humanist non-affiliated 50 (3.6%)
Secular affiliated 37 (2.6%)
Secular non affiliated 64 (4.5%)
other 245 (17.4%)
combination[1] 139 (9.9%)
Missing 7 (0.5%)
Total 1407 (100.0)

 

 

[1] By “combination”, we refer to people who identified with two or more of the belief categories, that is, two or more from the following list: humanist affiliated, humanist non-affiliated, secular affiliated, secular non-affiliated.